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TV's Most Influential Gay Male Sex Scenes

Website AfterElton.com has come up with a list of the best man-on-man action to steam up our screens over the years. These sort of things are always a cause for debate, but the list is refreshingly diverse - one would have thought that every scene on list would be lifted from Queer As Folk or Dante's Cove. But no...

Noah's Arc makes it to number three with that juicy coupling of Darryl Stephens and Jensen Atwood, and number five with the even juicier bootytastic hunkfest linking Christian Vincent and Nate Adams. As writer Christie Keith says on AfterElton, the scene "just busted onto TV screens without apology or angst." Anyone who's seen the original version of that scene in the pilot episode (included on the Season One boxset) will know just how steamy things got - before the demands of network television diluted things somewhat.

At number six is one of my personal favourites, that of Michael K. Williams (Omar) and Ernest Waddell (Dante) on The Wire. It isn't explicit or overplayed; there isn't any fuss. The character of Omar in The Wire is truly unique and groundbreaking, and unlike any depiction of a gay men anywhere else. Producer and writer Rod McCullom says their spine-tingling kiss was "debated across black pop culture, even discussed by rappers and basketball players." And what fag doesn't get a kick out of seeing Straight People running in fear as Omar strides down the street in his trench coat? Or is it just me?

The inclusion of Dante's Cove on the list is one I do take issue with, since it's nothing more than softcore porn - why not simply fill the list with Bel Ami or CocoDorm moments. Oz scrapes in at the bottom of the list, Keith commenting: "It's because somehow on this show, even though there's kissing and nudity and violence and suffering and even true love, there don't seem to be any actual sex scenes." I don't know about this - I can think of plenty of instances of graphic depictions of gay sex (often rape), and mostly involving Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje as Simon Adebisi. Oh, happy memories...

The list is also all-American, and so neglects series like the groundbreaking Metrosexuality and even the original British Queer As Folk (a series I hold no love for).
Still, the article makes for interesting reading, and signposts some joyous eye candy - and important moments for Us - in television.

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